CBD Tolerance: Can You Build Up a Tolerance to CBD Oil?

Table of Contents

  1. What is a CBD Tolerance?
  2. Types of Tolerance
  3. What is a CBD Reverse Tolerance?
  4. Took Too Much CBD?
  5. How to Get All CBD Benefits?
  6. Conclusion

People are becoming more conscious about the substances they put in their bodies. In an effort to potentially find relief from pain, inflammation, anxiety, depression, and other issues, many are turning to CBD.

This is because CBD is all-natural, which means it doesn’t come with the same side effects that many over-the-counter and prescription drugs have. If you are considering using CBD, you might be interested if you can build a tolerance to CBD?

What is a Tolerance to CBD?

Your body is really good at adapting to different substances. If you are currently taking or thinking about taking CBD to help with different ailments, you might be concerned that you will develop CBD tolerance. When that happens, you might discover that the same amount of CBD you have taken in the past doesn’t impact you. To get the same effect, you might have to increase your dosage.

However, at some point, you might find that no matter how much CBD you take, you can’t feel the effects anymore. This can be incredibly disheartening and frustrating, so you may be trying to decide if taking CBD at all is worth your time and effort.

Different Types of Tolerance

When it comes to understanding how to build tolerance, it’s important to know that there are three kinds.

1. Cellular Tolerance

It happens when your cells aren’t as responsive to a specific compound.

2. Metabolic Tolerance

This occurs when less of the substance makes it to the target area.

3. Behavioral Tolerance

This occurs when you become attuned psychologically to how the substance will impact you.

Tolerance, in general, impacts every person differently. If you have CBD oil build up in your system, you may be wondering what type of tolerance you will develop. Will it be cellular, metabolic, or behavioral?

The answer to that question is pretty surprising: it’s none of the above. It has been found that CBD doesn’t act like many of the other substances you ingest. In fact, it has what’s called CBD reverse tolerance.

What is a CBD Reverse Tolerance?

CBD works by interacting with your endocannabinoid system. Other cannabinoids, such as THC, have to bind to CB1 and CB2 receptors, which means if you constantly ingest THC, over time, you will build up a cellular tolerance.

CBD takes over the endocannabinoid system and might encourage your system to produce more endocannabinoids, which helps your body maintain balance

However, it has been found that CBD doesn’t bind to either of those receptors. Instead, it’s possible that CBD takes over the endocannabinoid system and might encourage your system to produce more endocannabinoids, which helps your body maintain balance.

When that happens, you might find that you need less CBD to get the same effects over time. This can be incredibly beneficial and encouraging when it comes to taking care of your body and taking a substance that could potentially help you live your best life.

What Happens if You Take Too Much CBD?

One of the reasons that many people decide to take CBD is because of the reduced chances of side effects and overdosing. While it’s possible to take too much CBD, the effects you’ll likely feel include drowsiness, lethargy, dizziness, or an upset stomach. There has never been a case of too much CBD causing death.

These may be the signs you notice if you have experienced CBD reverse tolerance, which could occur when taking the same amount of CBD you’ve always taken. When that happens, you might be wondering how to combat this issue. The easiest way to deal with these uncomfortable sensations is to reduce your daily intake of CBD.

How to Get All CBD Benefits?

Here are some tips on how not to overdose and get all possible health benefits from taking CBD oil.

  1. Take the lowest dose

    When you first started taking this product, you were advised to take the lowest dose and build up incrementally until you experienced the desired effects.
    If you don't know how much CBD to take and what doses to start with, check out the post “The Best CBD Dosage“.

  2. Reduce your CBD intake

    The same is true for reducing your CBD intake. You’ll incrementally lower your dosage until you achieve your desired feeling. If you get to the point where you are taking the lowest amount of CBD possible but still have some undesired effects, then you may need to reduce how many times during the day or week you ingest CBD or take a CBD tolerance break.

  3. Take a CBD tolerance break

    If you decide to take a CBD tolerance break, you need to give yourself enough time to get the CBD out of your system. This can vary from person to person, but, on average, it could take between three and seven days.

  4. Start taking CBD again

    After that time has passed, you can once again start with the lowest CBD dose and build up incrementally until you achieve your desired feelings.

CBD Oil and Tolerance

If you’ve been contemplating taking CBD, but you’ve been hesitant because you are worried about building up a tolerance, hopefully you now have some insight into what to expect.

Studies about what CBD is capable of are ongoing, but for those who take it frequently, they swear by its ability to make them feel good. CBD may be just what you need to feel your best.

Sources

  1. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15640760/
  2. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/expert-answers/is-cbd-safe-and-effective/faq-20446700
  3. https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/cannabidiol-cbd-what-we-know-and-what-we-dont-2018082414476
  4. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1525505019311163
  5. https://www.who.int/medicines/access/controlled-substances/CannabidiolCriticalReview.pdf
  6. https://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcoverage/aes/76647

By Alex Malkin

Alex Malkin is a CBD enthusiast, researcher, and the editor-in-chief at CBD.market. He's also the author of the book "CBD: A Door to Better Health" and a certified nutrition-and-wellness specialist.

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